A Three Hour Tour . . .

A Three Hour Tour . . .
Vol: 100 Issue: 4 Monday, January 4, 2010

A freezing cold front swept down from Siberia, engulfing most of northern China over the weekend.  Sub-zero temperatures forecasted for Bejiing over the next few days are expected to be the coldest in the last forty years.

Forty years ago it was 1970.  Back then, scientists were forecasting an approaching Ice Age as a consequence of mankind’s effect upon the climate.  

I did a search on the topic and found some interesting abstracts from the New York Times:

SCIENTISTS AGREE WORLD IS COLDER; But Climate Experts Meeting Here Fail to A
http://www.omegaletter.com/admin/tinymce/themes/advanced/langs/en.js
gree on Reasons for Change
January 30, 1961, Monday
By WALTER SULLIVAN
Section: BUSINESS FINANCIAL, Page 46, 1326 words
DISPLAYING FIRST PARAGRAPH – After a week of discussions on the causes of climate change, an assembly of specialists from several continents seems to have reached unanimous agreement on only one point: it is getting colder.
EARTH’S WEATHER GROWING COLDER; U.S. Among the Exceptions, Rome Symposium Hears
October 8, 1961, Sunday
Special to The New York Times.
Page 66, 386 words
DISPLAYING FIRST PARAGRAPH – ROME, Oct. 7 — The earth, with few regional exceptions, is undergoing “a persistent cold wave” that began in the Nineteen Forties, a United States weather man told a symposium on climate this week.

SCIENTISTS AGREE WORLD IS COLDER; But Climate Experts Meeting Here Fail to Agree on Reasons for Change
January 30, 1961, Monday
By WALTER SULLIVAN
Section: BUSINESS FINANCIAL, Page 46, 1326 words
DISPLAYING FIRST PARAGRAPH – After a week of discussions on the causes of climate change, an assembly of specialists from several continents seems to have reached unanimous agreement on only one point: it is getting colder.

EARTH’S WEATHER GROWING COLDER; U.S. Among the Exceptions, Rome Symposium Hears
October 8, 1961, Sunday
Special to The New York Times.
Page 66, 386 words
DISPLAYING FIRST PARAGRAPH – ROME, Oct. 7 — The earth, with few regional exceptions, is undergoing “a persistent cold wave” that began in the Nineteen Forties, a United States weather man told a symposium on climate this week.nternational Team of Specialists Finds No End in Sight to 30-Year Cooling Trend in Northern Hemisphere

January 5, 1978, Thursday
By WALTER SULLIVAN
Section: Sports, Page D17, 817 words
DISPLAYING FIRST PARAGRAPH – An international team of specialists has concluded from eight indexes of climate that there is no end in sight to the cooling trend of the last 30 years, at least in the Northern Hemisphere.

About the only difference between the cold weather back then and the cold weather now is that back then, nobody was arguing the cold was a byproduct of global warming.  

They were forecasting a new Ice Age.  Oddly, nobody seemed nearly as worried about freezing to death in the dark back then as we are about basking in the January sun right now. 

Evidently, we weren’t quite as gullible forty years ago. 

While the True Believers continue to demand the rest of us give up our cars, central heat and air and eating meat to prevent global warming,  temperatures in Iowa are hovering about thirty degrees below normal. 

According to a report in the Guardian UK the indigenous alpaca farmers in the Peruvian mountains “face extinction” as a consequence of increasingly colder temperatures that it blames on human activity.  

In Florida, orange growers are hoping to salvage some of their crops if they survive the cold weather forecast for the East Coast over the next few days. 

According to Accuweather, the cold weather snarling the American Midwest has only just begun — the next cold snap will be even colder than this one. 

If the plan was to lower the global thermostat, then at what point will the True Believers decide it’s been lowered enough?

Assessment:

On Saturday morning, Gayle and I loaded up the car to take the last of our daughters and granddaughter home after what I will always remember as the best family Christmas ever. 

They live about 200 miles away from our house but it is an easy drive.  We hop on a major highway ten miles from our house and don’t get off until five miles from her house.  

It’s usually about a three-hour drive. Since it was starting to snow, I figured it might take an extra half-hour or so.  

I miscalculated just a bit. It took twice that long. The roads were icy and the snow, while not blinding,  was thick enough to half our speed and double our driving time. 

We spent Saturday night at a local Holiday Inn and set out for home on Sunday.  I expected it to be bad, but we put it in the Lord’s Hands and asked Him to guide us to safety.    

We made it about 20 miles before running into what was about the most terrifying winter storm conditions I’ve ever experienced — and I’ve seen some humdingers. 

The combination of 40mph winds and lake effect snow falling at the rate of two inches an hour was more than even Canadian road crews were prepared to handle.  The main highway we were on was closed and we were detoured to an alternative route. 

About every mile or so, a car was spun out into a ditch or off the shoulder. Police cars with red lights flashing tried to navigate up the middle between two opposing lanes of traffic.

While they were going up the middle, the rest of us were wondering where the shoulder of the road was.  It was a nightmarish situation.

Every oncoming truck brought with it a rush of blinding snow and several terrifying seconds during which we waited to see if we hit anything, before it would clear enough for us to see if we were still on our side of the road.

The last time I experienced those kinds of driving conditions was during Buffalo’s Blizzard of ’77 — I could see a lot better back then.

We eventually slowed to a crawl, then a standstill, followed by a crawl, all the while unable to see further than the car directly ahead of us.   For ninety minutes we crawled this way before we reached the problem.

It was a traffic light.  The snow was so bad that only three or four cars could make it through the intersection per cycle.  

We drove like this, in the blinding snow, from just after lunch until almost seven pm — breaking our six-hour record for a three hour drive set on the way there. 

Finally, at long last, it appeared we had made it across the brutal lake effect snow bands blowing off Lake Huron.  

I expected we must be nearly home and we started watching out for signs, since we hadn’t a clue where we popped out of the blizzard.  

We’d been driving around in circles in the blizzard for more than six hours. The first sign we saw said we were fifteen miles from where we had started! 

We asked the Lord to see us safely through the storm and He did.  As it happened, had we pushed through, we likely would not have made it.  But being stubborn, I’m sure I would have tried.

Instead, He led us safely back to the same Holiday Inn.

We’re not entirely sure if we’ll be able to risk it today or if we’ll have to stay over another day.     But the Lord does — and after yesterday’s nightmare,  I’m leaving the rest of the hard decisions up to Him.  

But I think that the global thermostat is low enough, now.  

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About Pete Garcia

Christian, father, husband, veteran, pilot, and sinner saved by grace. I am a firm believer in, and follower of Jesus Christ. I am Pre-Trib, Dispensational, and Non-Denominational (but I lean Southern Baptist).

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